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Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) is an international research and teaching hub, housed at the University of Alberta, for the bourgeoning sub-field of Indigenous STS. Our mission is two-fold: 1) To build Indigenous scientific literacy by training graduate students, postdoctoral, and community fellows to grapple expertly with techno-scientific projects and topics that affect their territories, peoples, economies, and institutions; and 2) To produce research and public intellectual outputs with the goal to inform national, global, and Indigenous thought and policymaking related to science and technology. Indigenous STS is committed to building and supporting techno-scientific projects and ways of thinking that promote Indigenous self-determination.

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New era of genetic research must include more indigenous people, says Keolu Fox

Home/Kim TallBear, Media/New era of genetic research must include more indigenous people, says Keolu Fox
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New era of genetic research must include more indigenous people, says Keolu Fox

By Stephanie Cram, CBC News Posted: Apr 10, 2016 6:00 AM ET

Keolu Fox is on a mission to increase ethnic diversity in human genome sequencing.

Fox, an indigenous Hawaiian geneticist, was studying at the University of Washington when he discovered that less than four per cent of human genome sequencing is non-European, with less than one per cent being from indigenous people.

Human genome sequencing could play a key part in determining how genetics play a role in chronic diseases that disproportionately impact indigenous people, such as diabetes, Fox said.

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Racism in research models

Kim Tallbear, a professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, studies how science and technology impacts indigenous people. She believes cases like the Havasupai highlight how scientists often take a lot of leeway when deciding what to study.

“The broader act of racism was [Therese Markow’s] feeling that as a scientist she had the right to work on whatever she wanted to work on despite the sensitivities of the tribe and their own desires,” said Tallbear.

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By | 2017-10-01T22:10:38+00:00 April 10th, 2016|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media|0 Comments

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For inquiries and concerns of the posts and blogs, please email me at indigenous.sts@ualberta.ca

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