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Media2017-11-16T22:14:51+00:00
1805, 2018

Ep. 115: Why not everyone in Hawai’i is vexed over volcanoes

By |May 18th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|0 Comments

1. Love for lava: Why some Indigenous people in Hawai’i reject any effort to divert the flow of what others see as the utterly destructive output of the Kilauea volcano. 2. Home away from home: First Nations youth whose only chance for an education is far away in Thunder Bay advocate for a student residence in the city. 3. Living laboratories: a class action lawsuit seeks compensation for decades of medical experiments conducted on Indigenous people without their knowledge. Joining Rick Harp at the roundtable this week are Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. // Our theme is nesting by birocratic

1505, 2018

Ep. 114: The Paranoia and Perils of White Fright

By |May 15th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|0 Comments

This week // From bad to worse: amid accusations that racism drove an Indigenous dean of law away from Lakehead University, some question why it’s replaced her with a judge who jailed anti-mining Native leaders. Uneducated guess: how a white parent's paranoia almost turned two Native teens' dreams of college into a potential nightmare. Decision day: Quebec’s Superior Court quashes parts of Kahnawake’s controversial membership law. Back at the roundtable with host Rick Harp are Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, and U of A associate professor of Native studies Kim Tallbear. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

505, 2018

Ep. 113: A Second Slide into Settler Sexuality

By |May 5th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|0 Comments

Saddle up for our Settler sexuality sequel! Building on last week’s exploration of how Settler norms impact Indigenous notions of intimacy and interpersonal connections, we more explicitly discuss the erotically infused insights of Mohawk/Tuscarora writer, poet and broadcaster Janet Rogers. Insights she shared with our own Kim TallBear (associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) at ConvergeCon, the annual conference working to build sex positive communities. Joining host Rick Harp to reflect on Kim and Janet's dialogue is Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

1204, 2018

Ep. 110: How ‘Canada Reads’ still shunts Indigenous authors to the bottom of the book pile

By |April 12th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|0 Comments

Support us THIS WEEK // Big Steps: How some ancient footprints confirm (yet again) what Indigenous people keep telling scientists—how we’ve been here for a very, very long time. / [...]

3003, 2018

Ep. 108: Reading the larger lessons of Sherman Alexie’s literary rise and fall

By |March 30th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|0 Comments

THIS WEEK / 'Sorry' for the racism: As National Geographic tries to atone for its problematic history with non-white people, we assess how much credit (and critique) they deserve. / 'Sorry' for the sexual harassment: As Native American writer Sherman Alexie continues his free-fall amid accusations of mistreating women, we’ll read into his story for larger lessons. / 'Sorry' (not sorry) for the journalism: A Canadian reporter faces potential jail-time for embedding himself inside an Indigenous-led protest against an east coast mega-project. Joining host Rick Harp at this week’s roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

1903, 2018

Podcast: BroadScience – The Social Life of DNA Part 2: What does it mean to be Indigenous?

By |March 19th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media|0 Comments

This episode will conclude our series on the social life of DNA. First, on BiteSize Science (6.02min), we chat about Atlantic staff writer Ed Yong’s two-year mission to fix the gender imbalance in [...]

Mission:

Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) is an international research and teaching hub, housed at the University of Alberta, for the bourgeoning sub-field of Indigenous STS. Our mission is two-fold: 1) To build Indigenous scientific literacy by training graduate students, postdoctoral, and community fellows to grapple expertly with techno-scientific projects and topics that affect their territories, peoples, economies, and institutions; and 2) To produce research and public intellectual outputs with the goal to inform national, global, and Indigenous thought and policymaking related to science and technology. Indigenous STS is committed to building and supporting techno-scientific projects and ways of thinking that promote Indigenous self-determination.

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