MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program

/, Kim TallBear/MEDIA INDIGENA : Weekly Indigenous current affairs program
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Description

A weekly roundtable about Indigenous issues and events in Canada and beyond. Hosted by Rick Harp.

The Host: Rick Harp

Born and raised in Winnipeg, Manitoba, a city located both at the heart of the continent and smack dab in the middle of nowhere, Rick Harp is a citizen of the Peter Ballantyne Cree Nation in what’s now known as northern Saskatchewan. While pursuing his BA as a student of political science at Carleton University in Ottawa, Rick got bit hard by the radio bug at the campus and community station, CKCU-FM. Thus begat a twenty-plus-year career in broadcast media, including national and regional stints at CBC Radio, the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN), and NCI-FM. A former Artistic/Managing Director of the Winnipeg Aboriginal Film Festival, he is a co-founder and president of the INDIGENA Creative Group (MI’s parent company).

In 2010, Rick was eager to chart his own course, launching the online magazine MEDIA INDIGENA, whose roster of original Indigenous voices offered an intelligent alternative to mainstream perspectives. Although the site’s output has ebbed and flowed over the years, its recent re-invigoration as a weekly podcast heralds a return to form as a lively, active source of ‘Interactive Indigenous Insight.’

 

Taté Walker

Taté Walker is a Lakota storyteller, feminist activist, blogger, photographer, and social services professional who promotes cultural competency and inclusion for professionals in the workplace. She received her Bachelor of Arts in English-Communications from Fort Lewis College in Durango, Colo., in 2004, and her Masters of Science in Administration from the University of South Dakota in 2013.

Her experience includes more than 12 years as a professional multimedia journalist. She is the editor of Native Peoples magazine, which provides an international audience with fair and accurate representations of Indigenous perspectives and experiences in ways that educate, entertain and empower through journalistic storytelling.She also spent eight years within the social services sector in the fields of juvenile justice, civil rights, and youth and family advocacy. This, combined with her personal, professional and academic research in the areas of Native American identity and stereotypes, poverty, health, and sexuality, make Taté a dynamic and powerful speaker.Taté’s writings can be found at her blog Righting Red. To read her Everyday Feminism articles, click here. Location: Phoenix, Arizona

August 2018

Ep. 127: Why It’s Still Not Okay in Thunder Bay for Indigenous People

August 10th, 2018|

Our seventh Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about Thunder Bay, a small northwestern Ontario city where a huge amount of hostility has been directed at Indigenous people. It’s a negativity so persistent and pervasive, it is seemingly ingrained across a variety of the region’s institutions. Featured voices in this podcast include: CBC journalist Jody Porter; Karyn Pugliese, Executive Director of News and Current Affairs with the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, plus Lisa Girbav, a radio broadcaster from Tsimshian territory and a student at UBC; University of Alberta associate professor of Native Studies Kim TallBear, along with associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism Candis Callison; Ken Williams, an assistant professor with the University of Alberta's department of drama; Brock Pitawanakwat, assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury.

Ep. 126: Moving beyond lip service for Indigenous languages

August 3rd, 2018|

Our sixth Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about language: more specifically, the politics of Indigenous language rights and funding in Canada. Featured voices this episode include: Lorena Fontaine, an associate professor of Indigenous Governance at the University of Winnipeg; Karyn Pugliese, APTN's Executive Director of News and Current Affairs, along with Lisa Girbav, radio broadcaster and student from the Tsimshian territory; Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, plus Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

July 2018

Ep. 123: A taste of Indigenous food politics

July 13th, 2018|

Our third Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about food: it’s a veritable buffet of some of our most filling discussions, from access to traditional foods to culture clashes over Settler vs. Indigenous diets. Featured voices this podcast include Iqaluit, Nunavut mayor Madeleine Redfern; Kim Tallbear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta; Lakota activist and communications professional Taté Walker; and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism.

Ep. 122: Canada’s systems of (mis)education and Indigenous peoples

July 6th, 2018|

Our second Summer Series episode collects and connects conversations about education: from inadequate funding to lack of Indigenous representation in many school curricula, we explore systemic issues and the lived experience of some Indigenous learners in this realm. Featured voices this podcast include (in order of appearance): Ken Williams, assistant professor with the University of Alberta’s department of drama, along with journalist and entrepreneur Patrice Mousseau; Brock Pitawanakwat, an assistant professor of Indigenous studies at the University of Sudbury; APTN News & Current Affairs director Karyn Pugliese; Entrepreneur and commentator Robert Jago and lawyer and international advocate Danika Billie Littlechild; Kim Tallbear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Lakota activist and communications professional, Taté Walker; Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC’s Graduate School of Journalism

June 2018

Ep. 119: Why DNA “Indigenous ancestry” tests ain’t worth a doggone dime

June 16th, 2018|

THIS WEEK // Survey says: We opine on a poll asking Canadians what they think should be done regarding Indigenous peoples. Statistically insignificant: The auditor general does a number on the federal government's glaring gaps in data for First Nations reserves. Doggone DNA: Think you can trust those genetic tests that tell you how 'Indian' you are? Guess you missed that recent story of a lab that verified the tribal ancestry of a chihuahua! Joining Rick Harp at the roundtable once again are Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism, and Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

By |2017-11-16T22:45:46+00:00August 13th, 2017|Categories: INDIGENOUS PEOPLES, TECHNOSCIENCE, & ENVIRONMENT, Kim TallBear|0 Comments

About the Author:

For inquiries and concerns of the posts and blogs, please email me at indigenous.sts@ualberta.ca

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Mission:

Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) is an international research and teaching hub, housed at the University of Alberta, for the bourgeoning sub-field of Indigenous STS. Our mission is two-fold: 1) To build Indigenous scientific literacy by training graduate students, postdoctoral, and community fellows to grapple expertly with techno-scientific projects and topics that affect their territories, peoples, economies, and institutions; and 2) To produce research and public intellectual outputs with the goal to inform national, global, and Indigenous thought and policymaking related to science and technology. Indigenous STS is committed to building and supporting techno-scientific projects and ways of thinking that promote Indigenous self-determination.

Upcoming Events

  1. MEDIA INDIGENA live in Edmonton

    September 21 @ 7:00 PM - 10:00 PM MDT