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Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) is an international research and teaching hub, housed at the University of Alberta, for the bourgeoning sub-field of Indigenous STS. Our mission is two-fold: 1) To build Indigenous scientific literacy by training graduate students, postdoctoral, and community fellows to grapple expertly with techno-scientific projects and topics that affect their territories, peoples, economies, and institutions; and 2) To produce research and public intellectual outputs with the goal to inform national, global, and Indigenous thought and policymaking related to science and technology. Indigenous STS is committed to building and supporting techno-scientific projects and ways of thinking that promote Indigenous self-determination.

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DISRUPTING SETTLEMENT, SEX, AND NATURE – An Indigenous Logic of Relationality

Home/DECOLONIAL SUSTAINABILITY LABORATORY, Kim TallBear/DISRUPTING SETTLEMENT, SEX, AND NATURE – An Indigenous Logic of Relationality

Abstract

We live in an era of decimation dubbed the “anthropocene.” Settler-colonial states such as the US and Canada disproportionately consume the world. As we reconsider violent human practices and conceive of new ways of living with Earth in the face of a feared apocalypse, we must interrogate settler sexuality and family constructs that make both land and humans effectively (women, children, lovers) into property. Indigenous peoples—post-apocalyptic for centuries—have been disciplined by the state according to a monogamist, heteronormative, marriage-focused, nuclear family ideal that is central to the colonial project. Settler sexualities and their unsustainable kin forms do not only harm humans, but they harm the earth. I consider how expansive indigenous concepts of kin, including with other-than-humans, can serve as a provocation for moving (back? forward?) into more sustainable and just relations.

By | 2017-10-01T22:10:38+00:00 October 14th, 2016|Categories: DECOLONIAL SUSTAINABILITY LABORATORY, Kim TallBear|0 Comments

About the Author:

Principal Investigator;
Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment;
Associate Professor;

Faculty of Native Studies,
University of Alberta

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