MEDIA INDIGENA

//MEDIA INDIGENA

Ep. 113: A Second Slide into Settler Sexuality

By |2018-06-20T22:53:26+00:00May 5th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|

Saddle up for our Settler sexuality sequel! Building on last week’s exploration of how Settler norms impact Indigenous notions of intimacy and interpersonal connections, we more explicitly discuss the erotically infused insights of Mohawk/Tuscarora writer, poet and broadcaster Janet Rogers. Insights she shared with our own Kim TallBear (associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta) at ConvergeCon, the annual conference working to build sex positive communities. Joining host Rick Harp to reflect on Kim and Janet's dialogue is Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Ep. 110: How ‘Canada Reads’ still shunts Indigenous authors to the bottom of the book pile

By |2018-06-20T23:09:28+00:00April 12th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|

Support us THIS WEEK // Big Steps: How some ancient footprints confirm (yet again) what Indigenous people keep telling scientists—how we’ve been here for a very, very long time. / A Whale of a Culture: We peek through a window into how Iñupiaq people continue to co-exist with, and connect to, [...]

Ep. 108: Reading the larger lessons of Sherman Alexie’s literary rise and fall

By |2018-06-20T23:16:40+00:00March 30th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|

THIS WEEK / 'Sorry' for the racism: As National Geographic tries to atone for its problematic history with non-white people, we assess how much credit (and critique) they deserve. / 'Sorry' for the sexual harassment: As Native American writer Sherman Alexie continues his free-fall amid accusations of mistreating women, we’ll read into his story for larger lessons. / 'Sorry' (not sorry) for the journalism: A Canadian reporter faces potential jail-time for embedding himself inside an Indigenous-led protest against an east coast mega-project. Joining host Rick Harp at this week’s roundtable are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Ep. 105: How soon is too soon to teach kids about residential schools?

By |2018-06-20T23:35:03+00:00March 9th, 2018|Categories: Kim TallBear, Media, MEDIA INDIGENA|

Once upon a trigger: Did a school board and the media over-react after a parent found a children’s book about residential schools upsetting? Dumb pun: a Thunder Bay newspaper says it’s sorry for running a headline that makes light of a potential hate crime. Bite your tongues: A B.C. politician criticizes the province for investing more money in Indigenous languages revitalization instead of more cops. Joining host Rick Harp are Kim TallBear, associate professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta, and Candis Callison, associate professor at UBC's Graduate School of Journalism. // Our theme is 'nesting' by birocratic.

Mission:

Indigenous Science, Technology, and Society (Indigenous STS) is an international research and teaching hub, housed at the University of Alberta, for the bourgeoning sub-field of Indigenous STS. Our mission is two-fold: 1) To build Indigenous scientific literacy by training graduate students, postdoctoral, and community fellows to grapple expertly with techno-scientific projects and topics that affect their territories, peoples, economies, and institutions; and 2) To produce research and public intellectual outputs with the goal to inform national, global, and Indigenous thought and policymaking related to science and technology. Indigenous STS is committed to building and supporting techno-scientific projects and ways of thinking that promote Indigenous self-determination.

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